BACKBONE JS

Backbone.js gives structure to web applications by providing models with key-value binding and custom events, collections with a rich API of enumerable functions, views with declarative event handling, and connects it all to your existing API over a RESTful JSON interface.

With Backbone, you represent your data as Models, which can be created, validated, destroyed, and saved to the server. Whenever a UI action causes an attribute of a model to change, the model triggers a "change" event; all the Views that display the model's state can be notified of the change, so that they are able to respond accordingly, re-rendering themselves with the new information. In a finished Backbone app, you don't have to write the glue code that looks into the DOM to find an element with a specific id, and update the HTML manually — when the model changes, the views simply update themselves.

Architecture

Collections

A Collection helps you deal with a group of related models, handling the loading and saving of new models to the server and providing helper functions for performing aggregations or computations against a list of models. Aside from their own events, collections also proxy through all of the events that occur to models within them, allowing you to listen in one place for any change that might happen to any model in the collection.

View Rendering

Each View manages the rendering and user interaction within its own DOM element. If you're strict about not allowing views to reach outside of themselves, it helps keep your interface flexible — allowing views to be rendered in isolation in any place where they might be needed.

Models and Views

The single most important thing that Backbone can help you with is keeping your business logic separate from your user interface. When the two are entangled, change is hard; when logic doesn't depend on UI, your interface becomes easier to work with. A Model manages an internal table of data attributes, and triggers "change" events when any of its data is modified. Models handle syncing data with a persistence layer — usually a REST API with a backing database. Design your models as the atomic reusable objects containing all of the helpful functions for manipulating their particular bit of data. Models should be able to be passed around throughout your app, and used anywhere that bit of data is needed. A View is an atomic chunk of user interface. It often renders the data from a specific model, or number of models — but views can also be data-less chunks of UI that stand alone. Models should be generally unaware of views. Instead, views listen to the model "change" events, and react or re-render themselves appropriately.

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